View profile

BibliOBSESSED | Emails to make you smarter - Issue #3

Revue
 
Hello, again, and welcome back to your new favorite Friday email. Here's some good stuff I read (and
 

BibliOBSESSED

August 9 · Issue #3 · View online
BibliOBSESSED | Emails to make you smarter

Hello, again, and welcome back to your new favorite Friday email.
Here’s some good stuff I read (and watched and listened to) for you.
#1 - A formula for changing behaviors and habits.
#2 - A podcast episode on why the next ten years of your life are the most important years of your life (regardless of how old you are).
#3 - A quote about fear as a compass.
Hope you like the selection. 😃
—Amber (head reader at BibliOBSESSED)

#1
in WORK, LIFE, & SELF
A Formula for Changing Behaviors and Habits
(Prefer the full article? Read it here.)
Here’s a formula for changing habits and behaviors.
B=MAT
  • Where B = Behavior (the behavior you want—or don’t want)
  • And M = Motivation (to do the behavior)
  • And A = Ability (to do the behavior)
  • And T = Trigger (for the behavior)
Read the full article for examples on how to apply it.
Pretty sweet brain-trickery.
#2
in WORK & LIFE
Why the next ten years of your life are the most important years of your life
(Prefer the full article? Read it here.)
The James Altucher Show is definitely in my Top 5 favorite podcasts (you should subscribe, if you aren’t already), and one of his more recent episodes is one of my favorite episodes this year (that doesn’t happen often).
It’s worth a listen (or two) from start to finish, but one of my favorite parts is where they talk about why the next ten years of your life are the most important years of your life (regardless of how old you are), and you can find it at about 11:53.
(Note: I also liked the point where David gave his advice for people who don’t know what to do with their life at about 25:41. And how if you save $10 a day for 100 days, you’ll be wealthier than six out of ten Americans at about 45:40.)
475: David Bach - What Do You Need to Retire? (& How to Invest Money That Aligns with Your Values) - James Altucher
#3
in WORK & LIFE
Fear is a compass.
It’s prudent to be prepared and to know the road ahead so that you can be successful. It is not prudent to fail to begin because you are afraid that following your purpose will lead to your ultimate and untimely death. The bottom line in fear is this: if you’re not afraid, you should be afraid; do something to make yourself experience fear. If you are afraid—too afraid to begin living your life—you don’t need to be afraid. Fear is a sign that you are living your purpose. The more fear, the more you should celebrate, not cower! Here is my fear maxim: Unless you’re in mortal danger, fear is a compass showing you where to go.
in CONCLUSION
BibliOBSESSED (so you don't have to be)
So, that’s it for this issue. If you’re still hungry for more input, dive into the full podcast episode included above (definitely worth a listen—twice) and/or pick up a copy of the two books included in this edition of BibliOBSESSED.
Recommended reading:
In the meantime, we’ll be reading (and listening to and watching) more great stuff for you.
Until next Friday,
The Readers @ BibliOBSESSED
P.S. Why not be a smarty pants and forward this to a friend you think might like it? (You should. Definitely.) And, if this is your first time reading, you can subscribe here. (Don’t forget to do that, or you’ll totally miss out on the next issue with all the smart stuff.)
P.P.S. If there’s a topic you’d like us to read for you, hit REPLY and let us know. We’re always looking for more things to explore!
Okay—really, really. See you next Friday. 👋
We ♥ our sponsors.
Did you enjoy this issue?
This is a members only issue
You can manage your subscription here
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here
Powered by Revue
302 Washington St., #150-1999, San Diego, CA 92103
 

Become a member to read this issue in your inbox

Subscribe to our newsletter and become a paying member. Learn more.

Already a member? Click here

Fill out your email address

We'll send over this issue. Make sure to use your membership email address.